Portion 4 starts with one other attempt from your Wedding Visitor to get away, proven through the direct speech in the Wedding Guest, ‘I DREAD thee, old Mariner! ‘ The immediate speech is usually used to advise us which the Mariner is telling a story within the composition. The capitalization of the phrase, ‘fear’, is utilized to replicate the honest and afraid reaction of both Wedding Guests and the audience, following the tragic event which has occurred in the prior part.

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The first stanza is used to re-acquaint all of us with the heroes in Coleridge’s poem and that we are reminded that the Matros appears to have all of the features of a dead person, ‘long, and lank, and brown’, nevertheless is still with your life, reaffirming his liminal express; he is someplace inbetween existence and fatality. In stanza 2, the ‘glittering eye’ motif is echoed, reminding us of the Mariner’s presence, the novel eye signifies that he not really fully generally there, whilst ‘glittering’ possesses associations of witchery, furthering the concept the Mariner is a unnatural creature. In stanzas 3 and some, Coleridge generally focuses on the isolation with the Mariner.

In the 3rd stanza, we see the poet make use of a lot of repeating in order to talk the true level of isolation and his agony, ‘Alone, only, all on their own, Alone over a wide, vast sea! ‘ The anaphora emphasises his feelings of loneliness, although the assonance slows down the speed in which the poem read, allowing a lot of focus on his seclusion. Inside the 4th stanza, the Mariner equates fatality with magnificence because his loneliness grows to such an intolerable degree that he is exacerbated of the lifeless mariners; they are free of the torture the fact that Mariner is constantly on the endure exclusively, he recognizes the ‘many men [as] so beautiful! ‘ The intensifier inside the quote, ‘so’, demonstrates the mariner’s newly found love to get humanity, when he misses their particular company, additionally, it acts as a sign for his remorse, even though the exclamation mark simply serves to emphasise the affirmation.

He bitterly acknowledges that ‘a 1000 thousand slimy things go on; and so would [he]. ‘ Coleridge utilizes framework in this particular quote; the enjambment inside the line really helps to highlight which the horrors still live on; in that case with the use of the semi intestines, the Matros is able to liken himself to unnatural and horrible pets, highlighting the guilt that he continually feel. By the 6th stanza, the sense of guilt felt by the Mariner is very overwhelming that he is not able to pray, ‘I looked to Heaven, and tried to pray’.

The constant semantic fields associated with religion through this stanza, ‘prayer’, ‘saint’, recommend the reader which the Mariner is attempting to bring himself closer to Our god; it also signifies that the Mariner has begun his attempt at redemption, as at this moment, it’s so hard for him to disregard his own guilt. Inspite of his ‘prayer’ to Our god, he is not able to escape coming from his remorse through whatever because of a ‘wicked whisper’. His guilt proceeds into the seventh stanza, ‘the dead had been at my feet’, here, the dead mariners are not only a physical burden for the Old Mariner although also a burden, within his mind, on his already guilt ridden concious.

The chiasmus-like composition of the quote, ‘for the sky and the sea, and the sea plus the sky’, in the 7th stanza reflects the mariner’s self-reflection as he’s telling the storyplot, consolidating his role since storyteller. The deviation from the ballad form also creates a re-focus of lien; the estimate may be designed as another reminder that we are hearing a character’s account within a composition. The Mariner’s guilt can be strengthened, in the 8th stanza, when he states that the accusatory looks from the mariners, as they died, possess ‘never approved away’, not only have the expression of the mariners stayed with him, but the standard guilt has remained with him.

The ‘cold sweat’ that ‘melted coming from [the dead mariners’] limbs’ makes them seem to be almost life-like, the oxymoronic language really helps to convey their very own liminal condition. In the 8th stanza, the mariner says that the ‘curse in a deceased man’s eye’ is ‘more horrible than that’ of ‘an orphan’s curse’, reflecting the level of fault received by the Mariner, and his general guilt and shame. His suffering can be emphasised by Coleridge’s intertextual reference to the bible, ‘seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse’, as there exists an inference that God is penalizing the Mariner for wrecking one of His own creations, the Albatross.

Also, the quote suggests that the Matros is becoming closer to both the notion of God, and God, Him self. The 10th stanza partly 4 represents a moment of change, because the Mariner doesn’t recognize his guilt. Coleridge also communicates the opportunity of change, as he returns returning to the original ballad form through the sectet, suggesting that some kind of move is about to happen. The puro imagery utilized by Coleridge inside the stanza, ‘moon’, ‘sky’, and ‘star’, reephasizes the idea of changeover, the sky and stars commonly symbolise hope and create a perception of great anticipation, in addition to the moon, which can be often emblematic of transform.

The idea of move is backed further simply by Coleridge’s usage of gerund verbs, ‘moving’, ‘going’, in the stanza. Arguably, that they imply that the Mariner can be moving on by his previously overwhelming sense of guilt and instead, adopting new suggestions of character, God and humanity generally speaking. Indeed, in the 12th stanza, we see which the Mariner’s gratitude of nature is able to get his attention from his strong feelings of remorse, ‘the water-snakes…moved in tracks of perfect white’. The word, ‘tracks’, provides an impressive contrast together with the directionless mariner, he has become unable to connect with God and nature so far, when he views the water-snakes and their ‘tracks’ offer him some impression of quality and purpose.

The eleventh, 12th and 13th stanzas are all quintets; together they are able to reflect the Mariner’s transitional period in to the glory of nature, induced by ‘the moving moon’ in the tenth stanza. Inside the 13th and 14th stanzas, we see the Mariner’s newly found complete love for mother nature. Coleridge uses regal symbolism to convey the mariner’s appreciate for character, and to reveal the change brought by the moon, ‘rich attire’, ‘glossy green…and velvet’. Additionally , inside the 14th stanza, despite his description in the water-snakes royal aspects he’s unable to share the beauty of the products of character; ‘no tongue their magnificence might declare’.

His newfound admiration for nature has made him realise the fact that true splendor of mother nature is beyond the expression of mankind, and as he is humbled by religious beliefs and character he thinks that only Our god is capable of developing such things, ‘a spring of love gushed via my center and I blessed them uninformed. ‘ The part ends with him finally being touching God and religion, ‘I could pray’, meaning that he can more connected to a high power, God. There is also a signature mention of the the Albatross, ‘[it] dropped off and sank like lead in to the sea. ‘ Albatross presents the burden, as well as the simile shows that the burden of blame provides finally been released.

There is the assumption that the Albatross is now back contact with their natural environment, the sea, an element of nature. The enjambment in the line produces and emphasises a more visible interpretation of the Albatross separating the Mariner’s neck, since it reflects the bird’s down movement. At the conclusion of the portion, much of the Mariner’s initial guilt has been left behind or at least in the short term distracted by nature.

We buy the impression that the bane is over to get the Matros, as he is now starting to accept and adore world’s splendor, however this is simply Coleridge lulling us to a false feeling of reliability, as regretfully, the curse is not even close to over.

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